Search Results for "Lenni Lobel"

Leonard Lobel Awarded Microsoft MVP for SQL Server!

This month, Microsoft awarded 143 exceptional technical community leaders with the Most Valuable Professional (MVP) title and re-awarded 764 MVPs worldwide. Tallan is thrilled to announce that Lenni Lobel has been recognized as an MVP in SQL Server!
According to the Microsoft MVP Award Program Blog, there are more than 100 million social and technical community members, but only a small portion are selected to be recognized as MVPs. Members of this highly select group of experts are not Microsoft employees; they voluntarily share their passion and real-world knowledge of Microsoft products with others.
In addition to his role as Principal Consultant, Lenni is currently working on the new edition of Tallan’s SQL Server book, “Programming Microsoft SQL Server 2012″ (O’Reilly Media) and speaks regularly at industry conferences and user groups around the country.
Thank you and congratulations to Lenni for his commitment…

Working with FILESTREAM BLOBs in BizTalk

MSDN provides an example of INSERTing large data into SQL Server, leveraging the WCF-SQL adapter’s built in FILESTREAM capabilities.  However, it’s also possible to leverage the transaction enlisted by the WCF adapter in a custom pipeline to pull FILESTREAM data out of SQL Server more efficiently than the more common SELECT … FOR XML query which simply grabs the FILESTREAM content and stuffs it into an XML node in the resulting document.
Imagine, for example, you had a large document of some sort (XML, Flat File, etc.) to store in SQL Server that BizTalk would need to process from a FILESTREAM table defined like so:
The tradeoff here is losing the typed XML data in favor of more efficient storage and access to larger file objects (especially when the data will, on average, be large).  This can make a vast difference if you have…

Using T4 Templates to Generate C# Enums from SQL Server Database Tables

When building applications with C# and SQL Server, it is often necessary to define codes in the database that correspond with enums in the application. However, it can be burdensome to maintain the enums manually, as codes are added, modified, and deleted in the database.
In this blog post, I’ll share a T4 template that I wrote which does this automatically. I looked online first, and did find a few different solutions for this, but none that worked for me as-is. So, I built this generic T4 template to do the job, and you can use it too.
Let’s say you’ve got a Color table and ErrorType table in the database, populated as follows:

Now you’d like enums in your C# application that correspond to these rows. The T4 template will generate them as follows:

Before showing the code that generates this, let’s point…

Making the Case for Entity Framework in the Enterprise

Recently, I was met with some friction by the IT department at a client where, they asserted, that a decision had been made years ago to ban Entity Framework. Like many enterprise environments, this client was understandably concerned with the potential pitfalls of embracing Entity Framework. That meant that my job was to convince them otherwise – not to discount their apprehension, but quite the contrary – to demonstrate how EF can be leveraged for its advantages, and avoided for its shortcomings.
Entity Framework (EF) is a broad framework with many optional parts. There are several aspects of EF that provide great benefit, while others are a source of great consternation – particularly from the perspective of the database purist. As the cliché goes, “with great power comes great responsibility,” and so this blog post explores different aspects of EF, and…

Working with Temporal Tables in SQL Server 2016 (Part 2)

In my previous post, I introduced the concept of temporal data, and explained at a high level how SQL Server 2016 implements temporal tables. This post dives into the details of exactly how you create and query temporal tables.
Let’s start with an ordinary table, and convert it into a temporal table. So I’ll create the Employee table, and load it up with some data.

To convert this into a temporal table, first I’ll add the two period columns and then I’ll enable temporal and set dbo.EmployeeHistory as the name of the history table.

Note that because we’re converting an existing table, this must be done in two separate ALTER TABLE statements. For a new temporal table, you can create it and enable it with a single CREATE TABLE statement. Also, and because this is an existing table with existing data, it’s necessary…

Introducing Temporal Tables in SQL Server 2016 (Part 1)

SQL Server 2016 introduces System Version Tables, which is the formal name for the long awaited temporal data feature. In this blog post (part 1) I’ll explain what temporal is all about, and my next post will walk you through detailed demos on temporal.
Overview
Temporal means, time-related, and in the case of SQL Server, this means that you get point-in-time access to a table, allowing you to query not only the table’s current data, but data as it appeared in the table at any past point in time. So data that you overwrite with one or more update statements, or data that you blow away with a delete statement, is never really lost. It’s always and immediately available simply by telling your otherwise ordinary query to travel back in time when looking at the table.
The mechanism behind this magic is actually…

Overview of New SQL Server 2016 Developer Features

Every new version of SQL Server is packed with new features, and SQL Server 2016 is no exception. In this blog post, I briefly describe the major new developer focused features introduced in SQL Server 2016, which just launched on June 1. I’ll cover many of these features in greater depth, in upcoming posts.
• Drop If Exists is a small but convenient language enhancement which helps you write neater T-SQL code, because you no longer need to test if an object exists before deleting it.
• SESSION_CONTEXT gives you a dictionary object that maintains its state across the lifetime of the database connection, so it’s a new easy way to share state across stored procedures running on the server, and even to share state between the client and the server.
• With Dynamic Data Masking, or DDM, you can shield sensitive information…

Integrating document BLOB storage with SQL Server

NoSQL platforms can support highly scalable databases with BLOB attachments (images, documents, and other files), but if you think you need to embrace a NoSQL solution in lieu of SQL Server just because you have a high volume of BLOBs in your database, then think again. Sure, if you have good reasons to go with NoSQL anyway – for example, if you want the flexibility of schema-free tables, and you can accept the compromises of eventual transactional consistency – then NoSQL can fit the bill nicely.
But critical line-of-business applications often can’t afford the relaxed constraints of NoSQL databases, and usually require schemas that are strongly typed, with full transactional integrity; that is, a full-fledged relational database system (RDBMS). However, relational database platforms like SQL Server were originally designed and optimized to work primarily with structured data, not BLOBs. And so…

Bidirectional Communication Between Directives and Controllers in Angular

In Angular, it’s very easy for a directive to call into a controller. Working in the other direction – that is, calling a directive function from the controller – is not quite as intuitive. In this blog post, I’ll show you an easy way for your controllers to call functions defined in your directives.
First, calling a controller function from a directive is straightforward. You simply define a “callback” function in the controller and pass it to the directive (using the ‘&’ symbol in the isolated scope definition). It’s then trivial for the directive to invoke the function, which calls into the controller. To put things in .NET terms, this is akin to a user control (the directive) raising an event, which the user control’s host (the controller) can handle.
For example, you may want your directive to call your controller when the…

Calling C++ From SQL CLR C# Code

Ever since Microsoft integrated the .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR) into the relational database engine back in SQL Server 2005, the recommended technique for extending T-SQL with custom code has been to use SQL CLR with a .NET language (such as C# or VB). This is because CLR code is managed code, meaning that at runtime, the .NET framework ensures that ill-behaved code can never crash the process it’s running in. Prior to SQL CLR, the only way to extend T-SQL was with extended stored procedures written in native C++. Because native code is unmanaged, buggy C++ code can all too easily crash the process it’s running in. In the case of an extended stored procedure, this means crashing SQL Server itself, which I think we can all agree is a bad thing. It is for this very reason that…

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