Search Results for "Lenni Lobel"

Leonard Lobel Awarded Microsoft MVP for SQL Server!

This month, Microsoft awarded 143 exceptional technical community leaders with the Most Valuable Professional (MVP) title and re-awarded 764 MVPs worldwide. Tallan is thrilled to announce that Lenni Lobel has been recognized as an MVP in SQL Server!
According to the Microsoft MVP Award Program Blog, there are more than 100 million social and technical community members, but only a small portion are selected to be recognized as MVPs. Members of this highly select group of experts are not Microsoft employees; they voluntarily share their passion and real-world knowledge of Microsoft products with others.
In addition to his role as Principal Consultant, Lenni is currently working on the new edition of Tallan’s SQL Server book, “Programming Microsoft SQL Server 2012″ (O’Reilly Media) and speaks regularly at industry conferences and user groups around the country.
Thank you and congratulations to Lenni for his commitment…

Working with FILESTREAM BLOBs in BizTalk

MSDN provides an example of INSERTing large data into SQL Server, leveraging the WCF-SQL adapter’s built in FILESTREAM capabilities.  However, it’s also possible to leverage the transaction enlisted by the WCF adapter in a custom pipeline to pull FILESTREAM data out of SQL Server more efficiently than the more common SELECT … FOR XML query which simply grabs the FILESTREAM content and stuffs it into an XML node in the resulting document.
Imagine, for example, you had a large document of some sort (XML, Flat File, etc.) to store in SQL Server that BizTalk would need to process from a FILESTREAM table defined like so:
The tradeoff here is losing the typed XML data in favor of more efficient storage and access to larger file objects (especially when the data will, on average, be large).  This can make a vast difference if you have…

Adding a User to your Azure Subscription with Resource Group Access

Introduction
So, you’ve got your Azure subscription in place, and you’re the global administrator. Now you want to let someone else access your subscription, but only a specific resource group within your subscription. In this blog post, I’ll show you how to add a new user to your Azure subscription’s directory, and how to then grant permission for that user to a specific resource group within your Azure subscription that they can manage. The new user won’t be able to see or manage any resources in your subscription outside the resource group that you grant them access for.
Step-by-step procedure
Let’s get started. First, log in to the Azure portal and open your subscription’s directory. To do this, search for directory and choose Azure Active Directory, as follows:

Next, take note of the directory name; this is the domain name for the email address…

Horizontal Partitioning in Azure Cosmos DB

In Azure Cosmos DB, partitioning is what allows you to massively scale your database, not just in terms of storage but also throughput. You simply create a container in your database, and let Cosmos DB partition the data you store in that container, to manage its growth.
This means that you just work with the one container as a single logical resource where you store data. And you can just let the container grow and grow, without worrying about scale, because Cosmos DB creates as many partitions as needed behind the scenes to accommodate your data.
Automated Scale-Out
These partitions themselves are the physical storage for the data in your container. Think of partitions as individual buckets of data that, collectively, is the container. But you don’t need to think about it too much, because the whole idea is that it all just…

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Demystifying the Multi-Model Capabilities in Azure Cosmos DB

Azure Cosmos DB is Microsoft’s globally distributed, massively scalable, horizontally partitioned, low latency, fully indexed, multi-model NoSQL database.
If you start to elaborate on each of the bullet points in this soundbite opening, there’s a lot to discuss before you get to “multi-model NoSQL” at the tail end. Starting with “globally distributed,” Cosmos DB is – first and foremost – a database designed for modern web and mobile applications, which are (typically) global applications in nature. Simply by clicking the mouse on a map in the portal, your Cosmos DB database is instantly replicated anywhere and everywhere Microsoft hosts a data center (there are nearly 50 of them worldwide, to date). This delivers high availability and low latency to users wherever they’re located.
Cosmos DB also delivers virtually unlimited scale, both in terms of storage – via server-side horizontal partitioning, and throughput…

Understanding Consistency Levels in Azure Cosmos DB

Developers with a background in relational databases are accustomed to achieving data integrity using transactions. Once a writer updates a bank balance and commits the transaction, it’s entirely unacceptable for a reader to ever be served the previous value, and a relational database ensures that this never happens. In the NoSQL world, this is referred to as strong consistency. Achieving strong consistency in a NoSQL database is more challenging because NoSQL databases by design write to multiple replicas. And in the case of Azure Cosmos DB, these replicas can be geographically spread across multiple Microsoft data centers throughout the world.
First, let’s understand consistency within the context of a single data center.
In one Azure data center, your data is written out to multiple replicas (four at least). Consistency is all about whether or not you can be sure that the data…

Using T4 Templates to Generate C# Enums from SQL Server Database Tables

When building applications with C# and SQL Server, it is often necessary to define codes in the database that correspond with enums in the application. However, it can be burdensome to maintain the enums manually, as codes are added, modified, and deleted in the database.
In this blog post, I’ll share a T4 template that I wrote which does this automatically. I looked online first, and did find a few different solutions for this, but none that worked for me as-is. So, I built this generic T4 template to do the job, and you can use it too.
Let’s say you’ve got a Color table and ErrorType table in the database, populated as follows:

Now you’d like enums in your C# application that correspond to these rows. The T4 template will generate them as follows:

Before showing the code that generates this, let’s point…

Making the Case for Entity Framework in the Enterprise

Recently, I was met with some friction by the IT department at a client where, they asserted, that a decision had been made years ago to ban Entity Framework. Like many enterprise environments, this client was understandably concerned with the potential pitfalls of embracing Entity Framework. That meant that my job was to convince them otherwise – not to discount their apprehension, but quite the contrary – to demonstrate how EF can be leveraged for its advantages, and avoided for its shortcomings.
Entity Framework (EF) is a broad framework with many optional parts. There are several aspects of EF that provide great benefit, while others are a source of great consternation – particularly from the perspective of the database purist. As the cliché goes, “with great power comes great responsibility,” and so this blog post explores different aspects of EF, and…

Working with Temporal Tables in SQL Server 2016 (Part 2)

In my previous post, I introduced the concept of temporal data, and explained at a high level how SQL Server 2016 implements temporal tables. This post dives into the details of exactly how you create and query temporal tables.
Let’s start with an ordinary table, and convert it into a temporal table. So I’ll create the Employee table, and load it up with some data.

To convert this into a temporal table, first I’ll add the two period columns and then I’ll enable temporal and set dbo.EmployeeHistory as the name of the history table.

Note that because we’re converting an existing table, this must be done in two separate ALTER TABLE statements. For a new temporal table, you can create it and enable it with a single CREATE TABLE statement. Also, and because this is an existing table with existing data, it’s necessary…

Introducing Temporal Tables in SQL Server 2016 (Part 1)

SQL Server 2016 introduces System Version Tables, which is the formal name for the long awaited temporal data feature. In this blog post (part 1) I’ll explain what temporal is all about, and my next post will walk you through detailed demos on temporal.
Overview
Temporal means, time-related, and in the case of SQL Server, this means that you get point-in-time access to a table, allowing you to query not only the table’s current data, but data as it appeared in the table at any past point in time. So data that you overwrite with one or more update statements, or data that you blow away with a delete statement, is never really lost. It’s always and immediately available simply by telling your otherwise ordinary query to travel back in time when looking at the table.
The mechanism behind this magic is actually…

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