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Category Archive for "User Experience"

Why Insurers Should be Helping Their Customers Complain More

Here’s an interesting fact from a Forbes article published earlier this year, regarding end-consumers in the insurance industry:
“91% of non-complainers just leave”1
This tells us that there are two types of customers in the insurance world: complainers, and non-complainers.  Among non-complainers, more than nine out of ten actively choose to take their business to another company.  The insurer they leave behind must deal with the following consequences:

Loss of future revenue streams
Negative word-of-mouth
Lack of insight into why the customer chose to leave in the first place

The significance these metrics have on bottom line revenue can’t be understated.  These are customers that were already paying for a service – that had already gone through a decision-making process, chosen one insurer, and were so dismayed with some aspect of their service that they chose to begin this entire search process again.
But there’s a simple…

UXPA Boston 2018 Conference Recap

I attended UXPA Boston 2018, a one-day conference hosted at the Sheraton Boston. This was a highly anticipated event for me as it was my first year attending despite being interested in previous years. What’s more, this year’s conference happened to land on my birthday, so it was a real treat to break from the day-to-day routine!
I was especially looking forward to sessions by UXers from notable companies like LogMeIn, Google, and IBM on the topics of user research workshops, collaboration and the future of UX.
Attendees of this conference ranged from content writers, product managers to marketing professionals and beyond. I chatted with folks there, and it was interesting to learn how people in different roles and companies prioritized different topics.
Sessions:
Purpose Before Action – Why you need a Design Language System
Designers from IBM opened this session by outlining the definitions…

Design Systems: What Are They and How Can Products Benefit from Using Them

What is a design system?
A design system is a library of standard, extensible components that create a consistent visual language paired with accompanied defined behaviors for each component. Components are individual elements that stem from the atomic design methodology. They can be used as building blocks to assemble a user interface to be used across multiple applications, devices, screen sizes, and mediums.
Material design is an example of how components are paired with design specifications, defined with expected behaviors and guiding principles on usage (see figures 1 – 3). From there, a design system uses these standard components to build patterns such as inputs, buttons, navigations, error states, etc.
Why do design systems matter?
Design systems create a unified experience across platforms, devices and enterprise suites of applications. They create a strong, extensible base through a modular approach using consistent components and defined…

How to Drive and Plan an Envisioning for a Business Intranet

Introduction
We have all encountered intranets in our professional lives. Often, the intranet is where information goes to die and is forgotten. How do we break away from this pattern? Depending on whom you ask, some users may view the intranet as a tool to find HR Related information; others may use it to work collaboratively with a team who works remotely, and some will simply resist using it at all.
The road to overcoming common intranet missteps and misconceptions begins with a proper envisioning. We will discuss the process of envisioning a successful intranet, starting with a handful of factors: user and business stakeholder interviews, project requirements, documentation, and being mindful of the unique needs of your users as intranet solutions are not one-size-fits-all between companies—or even between departments within a single company.
Business Stakeholders
The first group of people you are going…

Bidirectional Communication Between Directives and Controllers in Angular

In Angular, it’s very easy for a directive to call into a controller. Working in the other direction – that is, calling a directive function from the controller – is not quite as intuitive. In this blog post, I’ll show you an easy way for your controllers to call functions defined in your directives.
First, calling a controller function from a directive is straightforward. You simply define a “callback” function in the controller and pass it to the directive (using the ‘&’ symbol in the isolated scope definition). It’s then trivial for the directive to invoke the function, which calls into the controller. To put things in .NET terms, this is akin to a user control (the directive) raising an event, which the user control’s host (the controller) can handle.
For example, you may want your directive to call your controller when the…

The Pendulum Swing of Flat Design

I dislike visual clutter. Most people do. Perhaps they can’t articulate it. I know most of our clients say things like, “It looks too crowded,” if presented with something that strikes them that way. They don’t use the words “visual clutter” as we would in design parlance.
However, that idea of clutter-reduction has recently over-reached its bounds in the oft-cited and overused mantra of “flat design.” I’m all for simplifying, but there are some designers who take it too far, slashing and ripping out things that they claim help to simplify the UI to its bare essentials, but they’re only thinking one-dimensionally, pun intended.

CEOs Really Should Champion UX Design … But from Afar

When you’re a hands-on CEO, you want to get involved in every aspect of your company. Now, as UX Design becomes a differentiating factor for product and company visibility, CEOs are paying more attention to design, but some, like Yahoo!’s Marissa Mayer, are ham-handing it.

The Joys of Printing from the Web

Print style sheets, should in theory, be simple. You strip out the complicated junk from your page, and format it a little better for a piece of paper. Right? Wrong. Print style sheets are a pain in the butt. They’re hard to debug, finicky depending on the browser, and downright annoying to get perfect.

The Science of User Experience Design

User Experience design has always been, and continues to be, a field riddled with ambiguous labeling and nomenclature. We hear all sorts of conjecture and debate as to what terms have what specific meaning. Are profiles and personas the same thing? When exactly do wireframes become mock-ups? Is “mock-up” supposed to hyphenated? These are issues of semantics, and when it comes to the actual meat of the work we do, we could call a wireframe a “whosamawhatsit” and it wouldn’t change it’s purpose. From the perspective of standardizing our professional space, common labeling is important. This is not in doubt. Client, asset, and project management aside, there is something vital to the decisions that we make as designers that is not addressed as often as it should be: Science.

Using Data Graphics in Visio 2013

Visio 2013 was released recently with updates including the new visio file format .vsdx, easier collaboration abilities and my favorite, the ability to provide data graphics to shapes. In this blog I will be discussing some of the basics of creating and using these data graphics with both internal Visio data and external data sources.

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